Furniture Slipcovers

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Furniture Slipcover Cushions

 

Should you Remove The Existing Cushion Covers on Slipcovers?

I would recommend that you don't take off the old cushion cover. The main idea of a slip cover is that is a "loose cover" over the existing cover. The client has the option of taking the slipcover off (assuming the old cover is still in OK condition"), and being able to have two different looks for her furniture; it's one color with the slipcover on, and another color when the slipcover it off. Some people like to be able to change colors of their furniture. If you are in doubt, I would suggest talking over the pros and cons with the client. Yes, the Welts from the original cover may show a little, but the probably won't show noticably if you:

 

  • Cut the cushion boxing just the right width -and-
  • After the cushion is sewn and stuffed, reach inside and turn the seam allowance so that it goes down evenly over the front edge of the cushion.

Yes, the cushion cover may be a little loose, but that makes it easier for the client take the cover off to clean it.

Sloppy Slipcovers? Quote: Or do I create the slipcover to go over the original cover - both of which have welting? The downside to this is that the cover will look sloppy. Slicovers Are Not Upholstery Two things in reply here. You and the client have to have different expectations for a slip cover. It is NOT an upholstery job. It won't fit exactly like an upholstery job. If you make it fit "tight", then, if the client cleans the slipcover, it might shrink and not fit any more. I would suggest that you make your covers just a little loose, to leave room for shrinkage. I usually talk over these options with the client at the time I'm taking the order. I explain their options

  • Nice and Snug: I can make the cover nice and snug so it looks nice and pretty when I give the furniture to them. But if the cover shrinks when the client cleans it, then the slipcover is useless.
  • Loose fitting: Or I can make it a little loose fitting (which, accornding to your message might mean a little sloppy), but it allows a little room for shrinkage. Also, by making the slipcover a little loose, you make it easier for the client to get it on and off, and less chance they will rip it. (I'm not talking about the very loose and baggy look. I don't like those things myself.)

Most of my clients have chosen to have me make it a little loose fitting. Slipcover Pictures Here are some pictures of slipcovers that I have made:http://www.winterssewing.com/html/slipcover_gallery.html  All of these have all of the old cover left on, including the corded cushion covers. I don't consider them sloppy or objectionable, and neither do my clients.

My Early Insecurities

When I first started making slipcovers (after doing upholstery for 25 years) I was very insecure. I had to make the slipcover nice and tight, just like an upholstery job. However, I was just thinking of my own need for "doing it perfectly". (Perfectionism has been one of my weak spots, and it can be such a cruel master.) I wasn't thinking about what was in the best interest of the client.

Custom Slipcovers

I usually ask the Client What They Want in a "Custom Fitted Slipcover" (Custom means according to the client's wishes.) I would suggest that you talk over your thoughts the client before you do them. I've found that when I'm fretting over a job, my wife is so good to encourage me to, "Honey, call the client and ask them." It works great.! Once I've talked it over with the client (or even had them come and see what I'm mean), I'm then at peace. No more fretting. The client has approved it in advance. Have the client prewash the fabric before Take off part of the old cover, such as the cushion covers? It is not recommended taking of the old cover. The color of the original cover usually alters the color of the slipcover a little. If you remove the original cover from any area, then the color affecting the top cover will be different. The color of the padding or cushioning, which will undoubtedly be different from the fabric color, will often alter the color of the slipcover. Laundering or drycleaning the fabric in advance. If their is a concern that the fabric may shrink, one solution is to have the fabric laundered or dry cleaned in advance. Use whatever type of cleaning method that the client will use in cleaning them.

Slip Cover Slide Shows

Slipcover Slideshow
Here are some pictures from a slipcover slide show on website.
As shown in this slide show, when making slipcovers, each section is individually cut, fit & sewn before a sew the sections together. After cutting the fabric from the roll, each piece of fabric is laid on the furniture "inside out", which makes it easy to pin to shape.

This not a "how to do it" slide show, but merely a "how it was done."

The links to the Slide show are below.



Links: to the Regular Slide Show .......  are in the following article

 

 

Slipcover Slideshow
Here are some pictures from the slipcover slide show that I just uploaded to my website.
Notes: Because the new slipcover fabric was so light, the loveseat was covered a sheet, which was left on through most of the fitting process. Also, the seam binding was made out of  drapery lining, cut diagonally.
As shown in this slide show, when making slipcovers, each section is individually cut, fit & sewn before a sew the sections together. After cutting the fabric from the roll, each piece of fabric is laid on the furniture "inside out", which makes it easy to pin to shape. I do almost all of my fitting inside out, until the skirt is put on. At that point the slipcover is turned rightside out and put on the furniture before the skirt is attached. Before the seams are bound, I do a final fitting to make sure it all fits (It would be very sad to have to take out that seam binding and refit the cover Cry )

This not a "how to do it" slide show, but merely a "how it was done."

The links to the Slide show are below.





Links:
Regular Slide Show,   click here. Change the "delay" to 5 seconds, and change the "max size" to "640 X 640"

Java Slide Show, click here
Change the "delay" to "5 seconds"

Tuck-In Corners on Slipcovers

Fitting "Tuck-In" Corners

 

We will look at how the "tuck-ins" for this corner are fitted. This shows the corners "tucked in" for a tailored "finished" look. this  Tutorial will demonstrate how to cut and fit the corners of the fabric to allow for this "tucking in".

 

 

 

Fitting "Tuck-In" Corners

(First Rough Draft: This tutorial is in the writing process. At this point, these are just some rough notes.)

Since this tutorial is directed towards fitting of the "tuck-in" areas, we will assume that you already have the other areas (front deck, arm fronts, etc.) fitted and sewn, ready for fitting.

We will be using this loveseat (shown with and without the cushions)  as an example for this tutorial.

  

 Tuck Ins

 We will look at how the "tuck-ins" for this corner are fitted. This shows the corners "tucked in" for a tailored "finished" look. this  Tutorial will demonstrate how to cut and fit the corners of the fabric to allow for this "tucking in".

 

  

Pictures show "Tucking In" The arm and deck areas.

 


 

  

 Cover Fitted Upside Down

 This picture shows the yellow cover, during the fitting process, put on the loveseat upside down. All the rest of the pictures/drawings will use this picture and this corner as the fitting corner. All pictures after this will be working with the cover Upside Down.  Many of the drawings have been made semi-transparent to better show how all the pieces fit together.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 Frame

Using this same corner, we have "overlayed" a drawing of where the frame boards under the cover are located.

It is much easier to fit inner corners on a slipcover if we have a basic idea of how the frame is made. when we cut to fit for the "tuck-ins", we are actually cutting the fabric to fit around the frame boards to go into the slots.

 

 

After this picture, the drawing of the frame is lightened, but still present to show how we are fitting the fabric around the frame

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Deck
We start with the deck. After the deck piece is sewn to fit the front corners (not shown), and sewn to the decking fabric (shown in green), lay decking fabric upside down on the sofa deck. After putting the front corners in place, lay the back of the decking fabric over the sofa deck. Spread the deck fabric and fold it over at the back and side edges,  as shown by the red arrows (F & G). This should leave at least 4 or 5 inches of the decking fabric folded on top (G).

 


 

/sites/default/files/how-tos/slipcovers/tuck-in11-arm-frame.JPG

 

 Inside Arm

Lay the Inside Arm upside down over the sofa arm. After lining up the front corners and edges, fold the back edge of the fabric vertically at the back corner (M) (as shown at the arrow). The back of the fold (M) should be tucked back tightly into the curner (but not tucked into the crevice). The "fold over" fabric (H) should have at least 4" or 5".

 

 

 

 

 

 Cutting Slits

This picture shows an enlarged view of the corner.

1. First we need to determine how deep the "cut around"  will need to be around the board. Push your finger in the crevice at the board (T) (The boards on some chairs and sofa is near the surface, while the boards on others may have several inches) For this example, we will assume that this loveseat has a "cut-around" depth of 1/2".

2.

 

 

Follow up:  I haven't yet taken the time to finish this tutorial. However, I have done a slipcover and made a slideshow of how the slipcover was done. In the middle of the slideshow there are some pictures of how this tuck-in process was done. Watch the slideshow a few times to better understand the process. You can stop the slideshow at any point to study any of the pictures.

To view the slipcover slideshow that shows the process, click here, or click on the picture below:

white slipcover